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TOL - PAGE RIGOLO 2 janvier 2009 à 1 h 26 min
VOUS POUVER ENCORE AGRANDIR LES IMAGES ENCORE
VOUS AVEZ DES IMAGES SUBLIMES DES QUATRE COINS DU MONDE ET DE CHEZ NOUS SUR VOTRE PAGE RIGOLO  .
TOL PRESSE DU 07/11/2010 à 18:18
Vous avez des photos sublimes de N’Djamena haute définition panoramique et de grande taille du mois de juin de cette année , faites vous plaisir à les voir et ça peut être du côte de chez vous .Vous pouvez les agrandir encore
















































TOL PRESSE VOTRE PAGE RIGOLO DU 31/10/2010 04:14
SÉLECTION D’IMAGES SUR LES ARBRES HORS DU COMMUN MODIFIER NATURELLEMENT OU PAR L’HOMME , VOUS POUVEZ AGRANDIR LES IMAGES ILS ILS SONT A 1024X768 PIXELS POUR VOUS LES METTRE  DANS LE MUR DE FACEBOOK OU FOND D’ÉCRANS DE PC OU TEL PORTABLE













































UN HOMME QUI CRIE DE MAHAMAT SALEH HAROUN

L’AFFICHE DU FILM

PHOTOS DE NOS ANCÊTRES LES SAO

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Planet War 

From the bloody civil wars in Africa to the rag-tag insurgiences in Southeast Asia, 33 conflicts are raging around the world today, and it’s often innocent civilians who suffer the most.

BY KAYVAN FARZANEH, ANDREW SWIFT, PETER WILLIAMS | FEBRUARY 22, 2010

http://www.foreignpolicy.com

Chad: Chad is entering its fifth year of nearly continuous civil war, its anti-government rebels often aided by neighboring Sudan. Compounding matters further, war-torn Chad is a relative safe haven not only for thousands of Darfuri refugees but also for those fleeing the Central African Republic next door — as many as 20 per day. Above, three Chadian soldiers take a break from fighting in the Battle of Am Dam, a two-day clash in May 2009 that saw the Chadian army successfully prevent a rebel group from taking the capital city of N’Djamena and toppling the government.

GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

Ogaden, Ethiopia: The Ogaden Liberation Front, a group of ethnic Somalis from a region of Ethiopia that juts into their native country, has been fighting for Ogaden independence since 1984 — an independence that would inevitably lead to incorporation into Somalia. Not eager for such an outcome, Ethiopia has cracked down in Ogaden, often preventing aid groups from operating there. Some think that the country’s 2006 invasion of Somalia was a pre-emptive move to warn Somalia’s Islamist government not to start fighting for « greater Somalia » with more zeal. Here, a boy tends to a herd of cattle in the largely nomadic, rural region on Jan. 17, 2008.

Aaron Maasho/AFP/Getty Images

Thailand: The Thai government has long had a strained relationship with its Muslim population, many of whom live in the southern region of Pattani. But the tension came to a head in 2004, when Islamist rebels in Pattani began a full-fledged separatist insurgency. Bangkok claims that the restive southern region will soon be stabilized. Meanwhile, the death toll continues to mount: As of March 2008, more than 3,000 militants had been killed. Above, Thai soldiers examine the corpse of a suspected Islamist militant shot in a firefight on Feb. 15, 2010. 

Modaree Tohlala/AFP/Getty Images

Uganda: For the past 22 years, fanatical guerrilla Joseph Kony has led the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in a rampage across the country’s north and into the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Sudan. At first, the movement aimed to overthrow the Ugandan government and establish a Christian theocracy. Today, it has deteriorated into pillaging and banditry. The movement is notorious for taking children as servants and fighters; an estimated 3,000 fill its ranks today. A cease-fire between the Ugandan government and the LRA during 2006-to-2008 talks in Juba, Sudan, inspired great hopes for peace, but the negotiations came to a disappointing end when, in April 2008, Kony backed out of the deal. Above, a woman and her children stand next to their destroyed hut in Uganda’s Amuria district on Sept. 24, 2007.

Peter Busomoke/AFP/Getty Images

Uzbekistan: Like Russia and other post-Soviet countries in the Caucasus and Central Asia, Uzbekistan has had a difficult time balancing the fight against Islamist extremism with the need to integrate its more moderate Muslim population. In particular, the Uzbek government’s habit of harassing and torturing suspected terrorists has frayed relations with local Muslim groups. Most recently, in 2005, members of the Uzbek Interior Ministry and security service opened fire on a crowd of Muslim protesters in Andijan. Estimates of the number killed range from 187 (the official government count) to more than 1,500 (the figure provided by an ex-Uzbek intelligence officer). Above, the Uzbek Embassy in London on May 17, 2005, defaced with red paint following the Andijan massacre.

Bruno Vincent/Getty Images

Yemen: Since June 2004, the Yemeni government has been at war with the Houthis, a militant Shiite group named after its now deceased leader, Hussein Badreddin al-Houthi. Some analysts see the conflict as a semicovert proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran, with Saudi Arabia, the major Sunni power in the region, backing the Yemeni government and even intervening with airstrikes and incursions along the countries’ border, while Iran, the major Shiite power in the region, supports the rebels. Although the Yemeni government and the Houthis signed a cease-fire agreement in early February 2010, it is too early to tell whether the accord will hold. Here, a band of Houthi rebels drive through Yemen’s Malahidh region near the Saudi border on Feb. 17, 2010.

AFP/Getty Images

Iraq: On Dec. 13, 2003, nine months after the U.S. invasion of Iraq, U.S. soldiers captured deposed Iraqi President Saddam Hussein on a farm near Tikrit in Operation Red Dawn. This success was followed by three years of civil war and chaos, during which U.S. forces were brutalized by Iraqi insurgents. Although the United States began to turn the tide of the war with Gen. David Petraeus’s 2007 troop surge, Iraq continues to suffer from political instability and frequent violence. Above, one of the approximately 50,000 U.S. troops that remain in Iraq stands guard at the Baghdad Provincial Council on Oct. 25, 2009, the site of a car bomb explosion just hours earlier.

Muhannad Fala’ah/Getty Images

Muhannad Fala’ah/Getty Images

Indonesia: Indonesia’s two easternmost provinces of Papua and West Papua have staged an insurgent campaign to secede from the archipelago country since the early 1960s. Under the U.S.-backed New York Agreement, the Netherlands ceded the provinces to Indonesia in 1961 — but without Papuan consent. Today, the low-intensity conflict churns on between Papuan insurgents armed with bows and arrows pitted against the Indonesian Army. The leader of the Free Papua Movement, Kelly Kwalia, was killed in a shootout with Indonesian forces last December. Here, members of the Free Papua Movement speak to the press on July 21, 2009, denying claims that they were involved in the 2002 attacks on a copper and gold mine.

BANJIR AMBARITA/AFP/Getty Images

Mexico: Although Mexico, a developed state with a robust middle class, has long battled narcotics smuggling and the violence that comes with it, the recent spike in drug-related deaths has many observers worried about the country’s trajectory. The number of people who have died in Mexico from drug-related violence since January 2007 — some 10,000 — exceeds the number of U.S. soldiers who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan. Despite President Felipe Calderón’s redoubled efforts to crack down on drug gangs, border cities such as Tijuana and Ciudad Juárez, which serve as major transshipment hubs for cocaine and marijuana, have become cauldrons of violence. Above stands a drug treatment center in Ciudad Juárez, where at least 18 people were killed and five wounded during a drug-related incident on Aug. 2, 2009.

Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images

South Sudan: Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir has the dubious distinction of being the world’s only acting head of state to be indicted for war crimes, with an International Criminal Court warrant issued on March 4, 2009, for his alleged crimes in Darfur. But Darfur isn’t Bashir’s only headache. South Sudan, a now-autonomous oil-rich region that fought Khartoum for two decades until the 2005 signing of the U.S.-facilitated Comprehensive Peace Agreement, has set a referendum for next year to decide on full secession. Elections scheduled for this year have caused both sides to start re-arming, and simmering violence in the South has killed scores in recent months. Here, al-Bashir is greeted by his supporters on March 18, 2009; he remains popular in the north.

ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Darfur, Sudan: In recent years the conflict in Darfur has become one of the world’s most well-known, thanks to a U.S.-based advocacy movement calling for an end to what many say is genocide. The conflict’s origins are geographic: Sudan’s power and resources are concentrated in its northern capital, Khartoum, and other regions of the country tend to be marginalized. In the early 2000s, rebels in the western region of Darfur took up arms in protest. Khartoum responded forcefully, arming nomadic Arab militias called janjaweed that pillaged and raped their way through Darfur, killing an estimated 300,000 Darfuris beginning in 2003. Today, fighting has calmed and a U.N. peacekeeping mission has soldiers on the ground. But more than 400,000 Sudanese refugees are living in camps abroad, and another 1.2 million are displaced within Sudan. Here, Sudanese refugees walk past an E.U. peacekeeping mission in Chad on March 12, 2009.

PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Northern Ireland: In 1969, a secret armed wing of Sinn Fein (Ireland’s oldest political party, founded in 1905) called the Provisional Irish Republican Army began a violent campaign to expel British troops stationed in Northern Ireland, which the radicals hoped to reunite with the rest of Ireland. The conflict escalated in 1972 when Westminster declared direct rule over Ulster. More than 3,500 people were killed between 1969 and 1998 — a period known as « the Troubles, » which ended with the 1998 Good Friday agreement. Infrequent remnants of this political unrest linger, as evidenced by the car above destroyed in Lurgan, Ireland, in March 2009.

P MUHLY/AFP/Getty Images

Peru: Since 1980, the Peruvian government has been working to stamp out the Shining Path, a Maoist guerrilla organization that seeks to displace what they see as a « bourgeois » government in Lima and install a « dictatorship of the proletariat. » Although the Shining Path was fairly active in the 1980s, the government’s 1992 arrest of Abimael Guzmán, the group’s leader, dealt a significant blow to its activities. But after a decade of dormancy, the Shining Path announced its comeback by exploding a bomb near the U.S. Embassy in Lima in March 2002, just days before a visit by then U.S. President George W. Bush. Here, Peruvian Interior Minister Luis Alva Castro inspects weapons and uniforms seized from Shining Path members during a clash with police in Tingo Maria on Nov. 27, 2007.

Colombia: Since 1964, Colombia has been the site of an low-intensity armed feud that has involved the Colombian government, paramilitary organizations, drug cartels, and guerilla forces such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN). Throughout the conflict, hostage-taking, drug-smuggling, and terrorist attacks against civilians have all become a familiar part of everyday life in much of Colombia. Above, a Colombian narcotics officer handles one of the 757 sticks of dynamite that were seized in Medellín during a Nov. 3, 2009 raid on a FARC weapons cache.

RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images

Burma: The Karen, an ethnic minority, have been fighting the Burmese government to establish an autonomous state called Kawthoolei along the Thailand border since 1949, making Burma’s one of the longest-lasting internal conflicts in the world. In June 2009, the Burmese military undertook an offensive against Karen strongholds on the Thailand-Burma border, crushing seven rebel camps and driving the remaining 4,000 Karen fighters even deeper into the jungle. Here, a soldier from the Karen National Union’s armed wing, the Karen National Liberation Army, carries a machine gun during celebrations marking the rebellion’s 57th anniversary, on January 31, 2006.

PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images

Central African Republic: In 2004, the Central African Republic (CAR) exploded into full-blown civil war after more than a decade of instability. Rebels calling themselves the Union of Democratic Forces for Unity initiated attacks against the government of President François Bozizé, who had seized power in a 2003 coup. Although the conflict officially ended with a peace agreement on April 13, 2007, sporadic violence continues to plague the CAR. Since 2007, the European Union has maintained a mission there whose purpose has been to assist the government and protect civilians. Above French Adjutant Michel Sampic speaks with Abdel Karim Yacoub, a deputy village chief in Dahel, CAR, on Feb. 12, 2009.

GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

Nepal: Although the 2006 comprehensive peace agreement marked the end of a 10-year civil war that pitted Maoists against the central government, Nepal has yet to find any semblance of political stability as its two major parties have squabbled incessantly. The most recent flare-up in Katmandu occurred in May 2009, when Maoist Prime Minister Prachanda resigned after President Ram Baran Yadav of the Nepali Congress party overturned the prime minister’s decision to fire a key general, Rookmangud Katawal. Here, a Nepalese student activist, affiliated with the Nepali Congress, protests Katawal’s dismissal on May 3, 2009.

PRADEEP SHRESTHA/AFP/Getty Images

South Ossetia: South Ossetia is a breakaway province of Georgia along that country’s Russian border. In 1988, the South Ossetian Popular Front (Ademon Nykhaz) was created to fight for secession from Georgia and reintegration with Russia. Military confrontations since then have been frequent, with major episodes in 1991, 1992, 2004, and most recently in 2008, when Russia joined the conflict in support of South Ossetian separatist forces. Today, South Ossetia is firmly in Russian control, but tensions remain high. Above, a convoy of Russian troops makes its way through the mountains toward the conflict in South Ossetia on Aug. 9, 2008.

DMITRY KOSTYUKOV/AFP/Getty Images

Nigeria: The militant movement in Nigeria’s Niger Delta sprung up after environmental activist Ken Saro-Wiwa and several of his colleagues were executed by the country’s military regime in 1995. Saro-Wiwa had been protesting the poverty and pollution of his home region after oil companies began exploring there a decade earlier. Today’s Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND), founded around 2003, demands a higher percentage of the country’s oil wealth and a cleanup of villages polluted by oil. This September 2008 photograph shows MEND members celebrating a recent victory against the Nigerian military. On Jan. 30, 2010, MEND reneged on a unilateral cease-fire it had adopted the previous October, which has led to widespread fear of kidnappings and attacks against oil companies.

PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images

Afghanistan: Mere months after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, U.S. forces drove the ruling Taliban and its al Qaeda allies out of power and installed a regime headed by President Hamid Karzai. Eight years later, elections have failed to bring stability, and the Taliban-led insurgency continues to rage. In December 2009, U.S. President Barack Obama ordered 30,000 more troops to join the flagging NATO efforts in Afghanistan, bringing the coalition contingent close to 150,000. Above, an Afghan family watches U.S. Marines near Marjah on Feb. 16, 2010.

PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images

India: According to Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, the raging Communist Party of India (Maoist), known as Naxalites after Naxalbari, the site of their first rebellion, are « the single biggest internal security challenge ever faced by our country. » Although the Naxalite movement began as little more than a local peasant rebellion in 1967, over time it has evolved into a regional insurgency whose aim is to overthrow the Indian regime and install a Maoist government. In the last decade, the movement has quadrupled in land area, today active in up to 223 districts of the country. Above, CPI (Maoist) members protest the Andhra Pradesh state government’s bus-fare hikes on Jan. 7, 2010.

NOAH SEELAM/AFP/Getty Images

Gaza: After disputed parliamentary elections and a bloody fight against the rival Palestinian Authority, Hamas gained full control of this impoverished strip of sand and soil in 2007. When Israel tightened its sanctions, Hamas and other groups retaliated by firing homemade Qassam rockets into nearby Israeli cities. In December 2008, Israel launched a massive operation aimed at crushing Hamas’s military capability. Neither side came out of the war untarnished; Hamas has since been accused of using human shields while Israel has battled allegations that it improperly utilized white phosphorus and indiscriminately killed civilians. Above, a Palestinian man searches through rubble after an Israeli airstrike destroyed his home on Jan. 5, 2009.

Getty Images

Philippines: The Philippines is home to one of Asia’s longest-running wars, a 40-year conflict that has taken 40,000 lives. The fighting began in 1969 with the formation of a communist rebel group called the New People’s Army (NPA), founded to overthrow Ferdinand Marcos’s dictatorship. Despite Marcos’s 1989 death, efforts by international mediators have continually failed, including the two-decades-long attempt by Norway that collapsed in 2004 and has not resumed. The NPA is known for its guerrilla tactics and recruitment of child soldiers, who by some estimates make up 40 percent of new recruits. Above, Philippine Army soldiers man a watchtower in Luzon on October 17, 2006.

ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images

Somalia: Somalia is a failed state and as such is controlled by several competing players. A weak government is seated in Mogadishu (backed by a joint U.N.-African Union force), while powerful warlords control territory across the country. Sharia courts provide some semblance of order while Islamist militias, the strongest of which is al-Shabab, are still gaining ground. In 2009, however, the major conflict narrowed into one between the central government and al-Shabab. Al-Shabab recently announced publicly that it would be joining the international jihad movement led by al Qaeda. Above, a government soldier stands next to the body of an Islamist militia fighter in Mogadishu where al-Shabab fighters attacked government positions on Dec. 1, 2009.

MOHAMED DAHIR/AFP/Getty Images

Somalia: This East African country has been without a central government since the 1990s and without peace for even longer. Shortly after ousting strongman leader Mohamed Siad Barre in January 1991, rebel groups began splintering into various camps headed by individual warlords. The United States intervened in 1992 with Operation Restore Hope, but pulled out in 1994, several months after the infamous « Black Hawk Down » incident. The Islamic Courts Union (ICU) government brought a measure of stability in 2006, but its reign was short-lived. Wary of spreading Islamist activity, an Ethiopian-led offensive installed a U.N.-backed Transitional Federal Government (TFG) in early 2007. Today, much of the country falls increasingly under the control of militant groups while the TFG and its president, Sheikh Sharif Sheikh Ahmed, a former ICU leader, control only a few blocks. Since 1991, hundreds of thousands of civilians have been killed, and the number of internally displaced persons is upwards of 1.5 million. Here, Somalis prepare a meal at a displaced persons camp near Mogadishu on Nov. 19, 2007.

ABDIRASHID ABDULLE/AFP/Getty Images

Pakistan: While Iraq and Afghanistan have captured much of the public’s attention of late, Pakistan may well be the country whose security, stability, and partnership is most important to American success in the war on terrorism. Under increased pressure from the United States, Islamabad has recently begun to intensify its efforts at fighting the Taliban within its borders. While Pakistani forces have enjoyed some success in their counter-insurgency operations against the Taliban, such success has come at the cost of alienating civilian populations and destabilizing Pakistani society. Above is a photograph from June 21, 2009 of Pakistani refugees who fled from the fighting in northwest Pakistan and are now living in the Shah Mansoor relief camp in Swabi, Pakistan.

Paula Bronstein /Getty Images

Pakistan: Pakistan’s North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) and Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) are two of the world’s most volatile war zones. Located along Pakistan’s porous, 1,500-mile border with Afghanistan, the two regions have, since 2001, seen fierce battles between Islamist militants and the Pakistani Army. Al Qaeda’s top leaders are thought to reside here, and U.S. drones patrol the skies in search of terrorist and Taliban leaders. Above, a Pakistani soldier stands guard while an Afghan-bound NATO oil tanker burns in Peshawar after being destroyed by militants on Feb. 1, 2010.

HASHAM AHMED/AFP/Getty Images

Korea: More than a half-century after the Korean War’s end, relations between communist North Korea and democratic South Korea remain tense. The two countries have never signed a formal peace agreement, and the United States continues to station well over 20,000 troops in the South. North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, who succeeded his father Kim Il Sung in 1994, has pushed forward with Pyongyang’s nuclear program despite repeated U.S. attempts to curtail it through negotiations. The North tested its first nuclear device in 2006, followed by a second in May 2009. Here, a North Korean soldier stands opposite a South Korean soldier at the border of the demilitarized zone dividing the two Koreas on Feb. 19, 2009.

JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images

Eastern Chad: Over the last half-decade, fighting in eastern Chad and neighboring Darfur, Sudan, have sent at least 400,000 refugees spilling into refugee camps in the dusty Chadian desert. Rebel groups in the two countries cite a litany of grievances ranging from state neglect to ethnic persecution, and they are often backed by one government or the other. Civilians have been caught in the crossfire, terrorized by wanton rape, scorched-earth tactics, and ethnic cleansing. Above, Sudanese refugee women carry branches for firewood at the Farchana refugee camp in Chad on June 26, 2008.

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

Eastern Congo: Eastern Congo has been particularly unstable since Rwandan Hutu militias (Interahamwe) and the Rwandan Tutsi military took their battle into the neighboring Congolese jungle following the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Since then, this massive, lawless region has been home to a number of rampaging militias, leading to the displacement of more than a million Congolese and the death of several million. In 2003, a Congolese Tutsi leader, Laurent Nkunda, took up the fight against the Hutu Interahamwe and established the National Congress for the Defense of the People (CNDP) militia. Nkunda was finally captured in January 2009 by Rwandan forces, though remnants of the CNDP and other rebel groups have continued to wreak havoc in the area. Above, family members carry a relative to be buried in a camp for displaced people near Goma on Jan. 19, 2009.

LIONEL HEALING/AFP/Getty Images

Kashmir: Kashmir has been the site of conflict since the 1947 partition of British India. The resulting countries, India and Pakistan, have fought three wars over the disputed territory, and border skirmishes remain frequent. Unrest in Indian-held Kashmir is also common; tensions flared recently over the deaths of two unarmed teenage Muslims. Here, a Kashmiri Muslim hurls a can of tear gas back to Indian police after it was shot into the streets of Srinagar to disperse a crowd of protesters on Feb. 5, 2010.

Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

China: A Uighur woman peers through a security fence as Chinese soldiers look on in Urumqi, Xinjiang, on July 9, 2009. The northwestern Chinese autonomous region is home to 13 major ethnic groups, the largest of which — at about 45 percent of the population — is the Uighurs. Although the region is classified as autonomous, some Uighurs have called for outright independence since the mid-1990s. While China has made attempts to further integrate Xinjiang, ethnic tensions, combined with religious repression and economic disparities between Han Chinese and Uighurs, have only made matters worse. When Uighur rioting broke out in Urumqi, the capital of Xinjiang, in July 2009, government forces dealt with the protests harshly; at least 150 people died.

PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images

Iran: Objecting to incumbent President Ahmadinejad’s victory in the 2009 presidential election, millions of Iranians took to the streets in support of opposition candidate Mir Hossein-Mousavi, who they thought had legitimately won the election, and in protest of what they thought to have been Ahmadinejad’s electoral fraud. The electoral protests, which were soon collectively referred to as the « Green Revolution », marked the most significant event in Iranian politics since the 1979 Islamic Revolution. But unlike the regimes that were unseated as a result the color revolutions » that swept across Serbia, Georgia, and Ukraine during the first half of the decade, the Iranian regime showed no reservations about using force to quash the protesters. Here, a protester wearing a symbolic green wristband covers his face after an altercation on Dec. 27, 2009 with the Basij, a praetorian guard that doubles as a thuggish internal security service.

AMIR SADEGHI/AFP/Getty Images

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La Bataille De Tchernobyl en français de 1/6

1/6 : http://www.dailymotion.com/Bresche/video/9458558

2/6 : http://www.dailymotion.com/Bresche/video/9459406

3/6 : http://www.dailymotion.com/Bresche/video/9460181

4/6 : http://www.dailymotion.com/Bresche/video/9461042

5/6 : http://www.dailymotion.com/Bresche/video/9461884

Après nous avons visité la ville de Tchernobyl, et a ensuite visité la centrale nucléaire de Tchernobyl, et nous sommes arrivés au point final de notre voyage – la ville de Pripyat. Il est situé à quelques kilomètres de l’usine. Pripyat a été fondée en 1970, dans le cadre de la construction de la centrale nucléaire de Tchernobyl en 1979 a reçu le statut de la ville. Population en Novembre 1985 à 47500 personnes. Après la pire catastrophe nucléaire en 1986, la population de la ville a été complètement évacuées et réinstallées dans nouvellement construites, à 50 kilomètres à l’est, sur la rive droite du Dniepr, la ville de Slavutich.

À Pripiat ont été exposés à la contamination par rayonnement élevés ne peuvent pas vivre. La ville entoure la clôture périphérique, passer et Voyage à travers le CAT. Dans les rues est un silence saisissant, construit progressivement à partir du moment de l’effondrement, la végétation pousse vite.

PHOTODOM.COM ФОТОДОМ | PHOTO ФОТО - Припять, призрачный город... | PHOTOGRAPHER ФОТОГРАФ - Марк Пономаренко | CATALOGUE КАТАЛОГ - ПЕЙЗАЖ

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Entrée à la ville d’origine nucléaire

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

À la fourche, le signe « Pripyat » – les restes de la célèbre « forêt rousse ». Il n’existe plus, la couche supérieure de l’ensemble de gazon a été coupé, enlevé et enterré.

 

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

La route de Pripyat. Après l’accident du viaduc sur le chemin de fer a reçu un second nom – « Le Pont de la mort ».

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

 

Dans le train on m’a dit à des photos seconde.

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Vue depuis le pont de Pripyat (photo 80-IES, Vlaskin II, avec pripyat.com)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

De notre temps

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Premièrement, après la maison CAT, décorées à l’ancienne, l’inscription a pratiquement disparu aujourd’hui sur Lénine, le PCUS, etc

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Époque, nous avions déjà un peu, donc nous avons regardé la ville, principalement à partir de l’autobus. Parmi les sites visités, qui ont normalement pour ressembler – piscine « Azure », à l’école numéro 3 et la zone centrale de l’espace d’attractions.

Le stock de logements est diversifiée. Maisons de hauteurs différentes, la plupart de 5 à 10 étages.

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Но были и два дома в 16-этажей

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Крышу одного из них украшает герб СССР

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Крышу второго

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Герб Украинской ССР

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Сквозь чащу едва уже видно бывший магазин

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Одна из улиц в центре

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Дом выходящий на центральную площадь (фото 80-х годов, Власкин И.И., с pripyat.com)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

А сейчас выглядит вот так

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

На центральной площади – Дом культуры « Энергетик »

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Гостиница « Полесье » на центральной площади города (фото 80-х годов, Власкин И.И., с pripyat.com)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Вид на гостиницу « Полесье » в наши дни

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Центральная площадь (фото 80-х годов, Власкин И.И., с pripyat.com)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

И сейчас

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

По территории парка и центральной площади разбросано много игрушек. Появились они здесь, конечно, уже в наше время, для придания фотографиям более яркой эмоциональной окраски.

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Плавательный бассейн « Лазурный » (фото 80-х годов, Власкин И.И., с pripyat.com)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Вход в спортзал

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Спортзал

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Вход в душевые

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Душевые

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Бассейн

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Рядом с бассейном – здание средней школы №3

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

В коридоре журналы, обрывки газет, агитплакаты и прочие атрибуты времен работы школы аккуратно разложены, чтобы не копаясь в пыли и грязи их можно было заснять.

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Коридор

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Один из классов

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Школьный двор

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Актовый зал (или спортзал)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Рукомойник перед входом в буфет-столовую

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Городской парк с аттракционами в центре города. Открытие парка было намечено на 1 мая 1986 года.

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Мертвый город Припять (63 фото + текст)

Prypiat, la ville fantôme (84 photos)

Prypiat se trouve à 2 km de la centrale nucléaire de Tchernobyl où l’explosion du réacteur n°4 s’est produit le 26 avril 1986. Avant la catastrophe de Tchernoby, la ville comptait 43 000 habitants. Contrairement à Tchernobyl, où plusieurs habitants, souvent âgés, sont revenus vivre dans leurs foyers, Pripiat reste une ville complètement déserte. Les scientifiques estiment que les éléments radioactifs les plus dangereux devraient atteindre la moitié de leur « vie » dans 900 ans et que le reste des radiations durera 48 000 années, en théorie.

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1. Gunkanjima (Japon): l’île interdite

ville fantome 6 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

2. Prypiat (Ukraine): la ville des travailleurs de Tchernobyl

ville fantome 2 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

crédit photo : Robert Polidori

3. Sanzhi (Taiwan): un parc futuriste un peu (trop) en avance sur son temps

ville fantome 3 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

4. Kolmanskop (Namibie): ville enterrée dans le sable

ville fantome 1 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

5. Oradour-sur-Glane (France) : ville témoin de l’horreur de la 2nde Guerre Mondiale

ville fantome 5 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

6. Craco (Italie): une ville médiévale fascinante

ville fantome 4 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

7. Kowloon Walled City (Chine): une ville sans foi ni loi

ville fantome 7 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

8. Famagusta (Chypre): ancienne destination touristique, mais sans club med

ville fantome 10 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

9. Agdam (Azerbaïdjan): habitée par 150 000 personnes… il y a quelques temps maintenant

ville fantome 9 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

10. Kadykchan (Russie): mémoires de l’Union Soviétique

ville fantome 8 Top 10 des villes fantômes quon a envie de traverser le temps de quelques photos

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TOL : 08:10

SI VOUS  AVEZ UN LIEN  UNE VIDÉO UN TRUC RIGOLO , DRÔLE , INSOLITE ,  N’HÉSITEZ PAS  A NOUS FAIRE PART MERCI LA RÉDACTION DE TOL L’ACTUALITÉ AUTREMENT ….

N’hésitez pas à transmettre ce lien à vos contacts  ::LIEN

La rédaction merci d’avance …

TOL : 01:03

Votre page rigolo est mise à jour le 24 janvier 2010

Un sketch en copie conforme de l’armée Tchadienne de 1990 à aujourd’hui .

La vidéo n’est pas claire mais le son est propre bon dimanche .

Photos coloniale d’Afrique des années 50 par RFI

BENIN VILLAGE LACUSTRE GANVIYE CALAVI

 

CAMEROUN DOUALA LA RUE

 

CAMEROUN LAMIDO

 

CAMEROUN SOUS PRÉFECTURE

 

COTE D’IVOIRE BOULANGERIE

 

COTE D’ IVOIRE ÉCOLE

 

COTE D’ IVOIRE GRAND MAGASIN

COTE D’ IVOIRE PONT HOUPHOUET BOIGNY

GABON FLEUVE

GABON LAMBARENE

MADAGASCASCAR RUE

SÉNÉGAL MAGASIN

SÉNÉGAL MARCHE

 

SÉNÉGAL CASERNE DES POMPIER A DAKAR

SÉNÉGAL CAFÉ DE PARIS COTE RUE

 

SÉNÉGAL UN HOMME AVEC SON MOUTON DERRIÈRE UNE USINE

TOGO UNE FOULE PHOTOS D’AFRIQUE AUX 50 FIN

Fin de la mise à  jour du 24/01/2010

 

mise à jour de votre page rigolo du 01/01/2010 à 03:20

 

Feux d’artifice à Londres.Reuters

Feux d’artifice dans le port de Sydney.

Reuters

Paris fête le Nouvel An aux abords de le Tour Eiffel.

Reuters

Rio de Janeiro en fête sur la plage de Copacabana.

Reuters

Des ballons dans le ciel de Tokyo.

Reuters

Nouvel An à la porte de Brandebourg à Berlin.

Reuters

 

Mise àur de votre page RIGOLO 23 décembre 2009

 

headline : Make your body the best place to live.

8687

 

566

VIDÉO

 

5th Typophile Film Festival Opening Titles

Incredible video made by BYU design students for he 5th Typophile Film Festival. It’s a visual typographic feast about the five senses, and how they contribute to and enhance our creativity. The amazing part,it’s all real,there is no GC effects.

Typography at it’s best.

rty

dsgdg

VIDÉO

 

New campaign from Nike to promote the sweat Hoody AW 77 called “Never without a Fight”. Directed by Dan Lowe and design from Veenom.

44

57

VIDÉO

 

nesteaface

Advertising Agency: Publicis Venezuela

Creative Directors: Douglas Rios, Eduardo Capuano, Demian Campos

Creatives: Demian Campos, Jose bajares, Manuel Fleitas, Prato Maru

Attendance: Dougmary Esquirajosa

Planning: Julio Grande

Photography: Harold Gonzalez

Great realization from BBDO Moscow for the Moscow News Newspaper.

sm_B4_Hiroshima

 

sm_B4_NewYork

me of a recent video contest, « Transformation : Live and React », Julien Lassort and Matthieu Burlot (France) explored the human face, the most exposed and personal part of the human body. Their dynamic portrayal of 1000 and one faces is a mosaic of portraits and emotions that plays off of the power of faces seen close up. Julien Fargo composed the melody that encapsulates the film.

VIDÉO

 

A superb execution and idea, on this operation of ambient-marketing for the mark McDonald’ S. an optical illusion on the lamps of Vancouver to promote the free coffee in all the city. By the agency Cossette Atlantic in Canada.

mcsign2-550x733

As well as an installation of bus stops evolving/moving progressively of the days.

mcsign3-550x349

alpro_island_big

client: Cadeau box / agency: Openhere

CadoBox squeeze_final

CadoBox_loft_kiss_fin

client: Eurostar / agency: TBWA

headline: London daytrip. Aller-retour

eurostar2-big

 

eurostar-big

client: Filigrane / agency: Air

headline : “Make your own movie,read a book.”

Kafka_Las_Vegas_posUK_big

client: Heinz / agency: Leo Burnett

headline: hot ketchup

fries-big

 

Leo_Cannes_Press_Alex.indd

client: Newspaper / agency: Openhere

headline : Neurotic policemen for all ?

NP_COPS_big

client: Panasonic

DURACELL_caterpillar big

 

DURACELL_avion big

client: bold / agency: LG&F

headline : encourage your children to sport

BOLD_ps-big

client: canvas / agency: Duval Guillaume

CANVAS big

client: cobis / agency: LG&F

headline : some day your computer might become a target

COBIS_TWINTOWERSbig

client: OVK / agency: Hapiness

headline: To kids the road looks different.

OVK_baudruche-big

 

OVK_basket-big

client: playstation 3 / agency: TBWA

headline : entertainment like you never seen before

PLAYSTATION3_OEIL-big

client: Worldgym / agency: LG&F

headline : you can’t solve every problem with your head

WORLDGYM_ASSENCEUR-big

 

WORLGYM_fonctionnaire-big

 

WORLDGYM_ARMOIRE-big

client: laxite / agency: DDB

headline: commuting becomes quite more interresting.

Metro, the free newspaper

METRO_cab-big

METRO_trein-big

 

METRO_tub-big

client: RSF / agency: Happiness

evolvescensorship too

Go on rsf.org and sign the petition against internet censorship.

RSF_menottes-big

client: radio contact / agency: Leo Burnett

headline : whatever happens, feel good

CONTACT_cro-big

 

CONTACT_dentiste-big

 

CONTACT_helico-BIG

Une histoire d’âne , une belle histoire cette fois ci , dans toute l’histoire de la vilaine et célèbre , bête , brute , robuste et serviable .

Du coup il change de comportement et de politique , pour dire à son maitre « l’homme » à part les charges ,les coup de bâton , le travail sans pause , la malnutrition ,l’exposition à toutes les intempéries du monde , je vous présente mon nouveau service .

je le propose aux unes , et je l’impose aux aux autres .

une vidéo , une vrais , à déguster sans modération.

cette vidéo n’est pas un montage les faits sont réels dégustez et partager .

Même l’âne peut changer de politique et de comportement sauf  Idriss debyl Itno …

une histoire vrais à vivre , sur tchadonline ces vidéos ne sont pas un montage , les faits sont réels dégustez et partager .

Mr l’Âne : à la plage quand il propose ses services .

 

ATTENTION : quand Mr. l’Âne se rebelle il s’impose sur son territoire 

 

Les plus vieilles jumelles du monde sont chinoises, elles ont 104 ans et se nomment les soeurs Qiao. Elles vivent dans la ville de Weifang, située dans la province de Shandong, à l’est de la Chine. Elles succèdent aux Japonaises Kin Narita et Gin Kanie, nées en 1892, décédées respectivement en 2000 et 2001. (Photo prise le dimanche 29 novembre)

 

Émirats arabes, le 16 novembre, sur la plage de Jumeira. Face-à-face improbable entre cet homme et ces majorettes lors de la répétition en vue de la coupe du monde de beach-soccer, à Dubaï.

Entre deux eaux, les mâchoires ouvertes, prêtes à se refermer sur leur proie, un crocodile photographié ici au Botswana est à l’affût. Malgré son nom, le crocodile du Nil (Crocodylus niloticus) est présent dans la plupart des pays d’Afrique et se trouve dans des habitats très diversifiés : lacs, fleuves, marais d’eau douce ou d’eau saumâtre. Opportuniste, il se nourrit aussi bien d’invertébrés aquatiques que de poissons et d’amphibiens. Mais i l peut aussi s’attaquer à des antilopes, des buffles ou de jeunes hippopotames. Sa réputation de mangeur d’hommes n’est pas infondée ; bien qu’il n’existe aucune statistique sur sa dangerosité réelle.

En Malaisie, lors de la cérémonie d’honneur à la Chambre du Parlement, à Kuala Lumpur, des soldats saluent, le 10 novembre, l’arrivée du président chinois Hu Jintao, qui doit s’entretenir avec les hauts fonctionnaires du pays sur des sujets internationaux.

MISE A JOUR DU 02 décembre 2009 à 02:13

 

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MISA A DU 18/10/2009 à 17:55MISA A DU 18/10/2009 à 17:55 MISE A JOUR DU 30/10/2009

serres moi plus fort (droles de plantes)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, serres moi plus fort

tu vois!!! (droles de plantes)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, tu vois!!!

il a tout mouille en dessus.. (droles de plantes)

/Blog de nino :vivement le sport, il a tout mouille en dessus..

cest gradue mais faites attention auepines en bas !!!

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, cest gradue mais faites attention aux epines en bas !!!

belles et saines ces coupines « oignons »

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, belles et saines ces coupines 'oignons'

cours, jettes mais ne reste pas comme ca!!!

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, cours, jettes mais ne reste pas comme ca!!!

la belle soeur »pasteque »ne fais pas d »ettique.

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, la belle soeur'pasteque'ne fais pas d'ettique.

le beau frere »citron »meme pale fais des efforts..

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, le beau frere'citron'meme pale fais des efforts..

le cousin lui semble plus virile

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, le cousin lui semble plus virile

qui s »y frotte s » y pique (droles de plantes)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, qui  s'y frotte s' y pique

fini la langue de bois. (droles de plantes)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, fini la langue de bois.

c »est torp grand pour ta petite bouche !!!!

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, c'est torp grand pour ta petite bouche !!!!

un peu de ballet.. (droles de plantes)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, un peu de ballet..

a cousine « navet »(droles de plantes)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, la cousine 'navet'

carottetes en mini-jupes!!!(droles de plantes)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, carottetes en mini-jupes!!!

jolie couple de carottes

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, jolie couple de carottes

spaghetti integriste !!!(videos divers..)

un cul en plein nature… (nature sexy)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, un cul  en plein nature...

du sexe – bio… (nature sexy)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, du sexe - bio...

« annee prochaine ils auront un enfant lozerois et une fille aveyronnaise…

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, l'annee prochaine ils auront un enfant lozerois et une fille aveyronnaise...

l »annee prochaine je t »oucherais le sol.

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, l'annee prochaine je t'oucherais le sol.

au pied du mont « phallus » (nature sexy)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, au pied du mont 'phallus'

une paysane pas une touriste (humour)

touche s a mon ballon!! (humour)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, touche pas a mon ballon!!

l » avion est americain le cul??? (humour)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, l' avion est americain le cul???

c kallou qui a fait ca???

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, c kallou qui a fait ca???

la transparence totale (des femmes pas comme les autres)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, la transparence totale

des 16/9eme pour la chambre a coucher (des femmes pas comme les autres)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, des 16/9eme pour la chambre a coucher

sexellement parlons

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, sexellement parlons

un libaral totalitaire (les politiciens)

Blog de nino :vivement le sport, un libaral totalitaire

jeu des 7 erreurs

MISA A DU 18/10/2009 à 17:55

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Observing Ramadan

Le texte en français traduit par tol

Fidèles musulmans à travers le monde sont actuellement en observant le mois sacré du Ramadan. Les musulmans pratiquants de participer à jeun (sawm), l’un des cinq piliers de leur foi, à l’ensemble du mois lunaire (cette année, elle s’étend du 1er Septembre au 30). Manger, boire, de fumer et l’activité sexuelle est interdite, de l’aube jusqu’au coucher du soleil, quand le jeûne est rompu avec le repas du soir appelé Iftar. Les coutumes locales de définir différentes traditions, y compris différents types d’aliments utilisés pour rompre le jeûne quotidien. Le jeûne vise à enseigner une personne de patience, d’humilité et de sacrifice, de mettre de côté le temps de demander le pardon, la pratique de la maîtrise de soi, et priez pour les guider dans l’avenir.

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Texte original en anglais

Muslim faithful throughout the world are currently observing the holy month of Ramadan. Observant Muslims participate in fasting (sawm), one of the five pillars of their faith, this entire Lunar month (this year it extends from September 1st to the 30th). Eating, drinking, smoking and sexual activity is prohibited from dawn until sunset, when the fast is broken with the evening meal called Iftar. Local customs define varying traditions, including differing types of food used to break the daily fast. The fasting is meant to teach a person patience, humility and sacrifice, to set aside time to ask forgiveness, practice self-restraint, and pray for guidance in the future. (35 photos total)

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Symbolizing the faith of Islam, the crescent moon is seen at sunset on top of the Faisal Mosque in Islamabad, Pakistan, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

Symbolisant à la foi de l’Islam, le croissant lunaire est vu au coucher du soleil au-dessus de la mosquée Fayçal à Islamabad, Pakistan, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008. (AP Photo / Wally Santana)

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An officer of Brunei’s Islamic authority looks through a telescope as he performs « rukyah », the sighting of the new moon for Ramadan, over the skies of Bukit Agok outside Bandar Seri Begawan August 31, 2008. Muslims scan the sky at dusk at the end of their lunar calendar’s eighth month in search of the new moon to proclaim the beginning of Ramadan. (REUTERS/Ahim Rani) #

2

Un officier de l’autorité islamique du Brunéi regarde à travers un télescope, comme il l’interprète « rukyah », l’observation de la nouvelle lune pour le Ramadan, dans le ciel de Bukit Agok extérieur Bandar Seri Begawan août 31, 2008. Les musulmans regardent le ciel au crépuscule, à la fin du huitième mois de leur calendrier lunaire, à la recherche de la nouvelle lune pour annoncer le début du Ramadan. (REUTERS / Ahim Rani) #

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A Palestinian man reads from the Koran, during the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan, in a mosque in the West Bank city of Jenin, Thursday, Sept. 11, 2008. (AP Photo/Mohammed Ballas) #

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Un Palestinien lectures du Coran, pendant le mois de jeûne musulman du Ramadan, dans une mosquée de la ville de Jénine en Cisjordanie, Thursday, Sept. 11, 2008. (AP Photo / Mohammed Ballas) #

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Indonesian men attend Friday prayer at Istiqlal mosque, the biggest in Southeast Asia, in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Sept. 12, 2008. (AP Photo/Irwin Fedriansyah) #

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Hommes indonésiens fréquentent la prière du vendredi à la mosquée Istiqlal, la plus grande en Asie du Sud, à Jakarta, en Indonésie, le vendredi 12 septembre 2008. (AP Photo / Irwin Fedriansyah) #

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Jordanian Muslim girls queue in line outside a humanitarian center for waiting for meals to be donated at the time for the breaking of their fast, or Iftar, on the 13th day of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan in Amman, Jordan, Saturday, Sept. 13, 2008. (AP Photo/Nader Daoud) #

5

Jordanienne filles musulmanes file d’attente en ligne devant un centre humanitaire d’attente pour les repas qui seront remis au moment de la rupture de leur jeûne, ou Iftar, le 13ème jour du mois de jeûne musulman du Ramadan, à Amman, en Jordanie, samedi, septembre 13. 2008. (AP Photo / Nader Daoud) #

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A Palestinian woman is seen on her way to pray for the holy fasting month of Ramadan at the Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem’s Old City, Friday, Sept. 12, 2008.(AP Photo/Bernat Armangue) #

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Une femme palestinienne se voit sur sa façon de prier pour le mois de jeûne du ramadan à la mosquée d’Al Aqsa dans la Vieille Ville de Jérusalem, le vendredi 12 septembre 2008. (AP Photo / Bernat Armangué) #

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Palestinian women lead young girls through the Kalandia checkpoint, on the outskirts of the West Bank city of Ramallah, to cross to Jerusalem to attend Friday prayers at the Al-Aqsa mosques compound on September 19, 2008. Thousands of Muslim faithful have been crossing every week from the West bank to attend Friday prayers at the Al-Aqsa, Islam’s third holiest shrine, since the start of the holy month of Ramadan three weeks ago. (DAVID FURST/AFP/Getty Images) #

7

Les femmes palestiniennes conduisent les jeunes filles à travers le barrage de Kalandia, à la périphérie de la ville de Ramallah en Cisjordanie, pour traverser à Jérusalem pour assister aux prières du vendredi à la mosquée Al-Aqsa, composé sur Septembre 19, 2008. Des milliers de fidèles musulmans ont traversé toutes les semaines de la Cisjordanie pour assister à la prière du vendredi à la mosquée Al-Aqsa, troisième lieu saint de l’Islam, depuis le début du mois sacré du Ramadan, il ya trois semaines. (DAVID FURST / AFP / Getty Images) #

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Israeli border police hold back Palestinians on their way to pray for the holy fasting month of Ramadan at the Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem’s Old City, at Kalandia checkpoint, between the West Bank town of Ramallah and Jerusalem, Friday, Sept. 12, 2008. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue) #

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La police des frontières israéliennes retiennent les Palestiniens sur leur manière de prier pour le mois de jeûne du ramadan à la mosquée d’Al Aqsa dans la Vieille Ville de Jérusalem, au point de contrôle de Kalandia, entre la ville de Ramallah en Cisjordanie et à Jérusalem, le vendredi 12 septembre 2008. (AP Photo / Bernat Armangué) #

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Palestinian women walk past men (on the other side of the fence) waiting to cross a checkpoint to get into Israel in order to pray for the holy fasting month of Ramadan at the Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem’s Old City, in the West Bank town of Bethlehem, Friday, Sept. 12, 2008. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill) #

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Les femmes palestiniennes marche hommes passé (de l’autre côté de la barrière) qui attendent de traverser un poste de contrôle pour entrer en Israël afin de prier pour le mois de jeûne du ramadan à la mosquée d’Al Aqsa dans la Vieille Ville de Jérusalem, dans la ville cisjordanienne de Bethléem, le vendredi 12 septembre 2008. (AP Photo / Tara Todras-Whitehill) #

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This picture taken September 5, 2008 shows a stall worker preparing roasted chicken wings to be sold at a Ramadan bazaar in downtown Kuala Lumpur for the breaking of their fast. In Muslim households across Asia, the inflation crisis is casting a shadow over the holy month of Ramadan, and making the nightly ritual of breaking the fast a more meagre affair. From Afghanistan to Malaysia, the high prices of food are forcing the poor to go without, and curtailing the lavish evening buffets which the well-off have flocked to in better economic times. (KAMARUL AKHIR/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Cette image prise 5 Septembre 2008, indique un travailleur de décrochage préparer les ailes de poulet grillées à être vendus dans un bazar du Ramadan dans le centre de Kuala Lumpur pour la rupture de leur jeûne. Dans les ménages musulmans à travers l’Asie, la crise de l’inflation jette une ombre sur le mois sacré du Ramadan, et de faire le rituel nocturne de la rupture du jeûne une affaire plus maigres. De l’Afghanistan à la Malaisie, les prix élevés des produits alimentaires forcent les pauvres à se passer, et à freiner les buffets soirées somptueuses où le bien-off ont afflué à l’conjoncture économique s’améliore. (KAMARUL AKHIR / AFP / Getty Images) #

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Kashmiri Muslims pray inside the Jamia Masjid, or Grand Mosque, on the first Friday of Ramadan in Srinagar, India, Friday, Sept. 5, 2008. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin) #

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Kashmiri musulmans prient dans la mosquée Jamia, ou Grande Mosquée, le premier vendredi du Ramadan, à Srinagar, en Inde, le vendredi 5 septembre 2008. (AP Photo / Dar Yasin) #

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A Pakistani man prepares sweet drinks for people to break their fast at a mosque during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan in Lahore on September 3, 2008. (Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Un Pakistanais prépare les boissons sucrées pour les personnes à rompre leur jeûne dans une mosquée pendant le mois de jeûne musulman du ramadan à Lahore le 3 Septembre, 2008. (Arif Ali / AFP / Getty Images) #

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A Palestinian boy holds a homemade sparkler firework after breaking his fast at the end of the second day of Ramadan in the West Bank city of Ramallah,Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2008. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen) #

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Un enfant palestinien, est titulaire d’un feu d’artifice Sparkler maison après avoir rompu le jeûne à la fin de la deuxième journée du Ramadan dans la ville de Ramallah en Cisjordanie, Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2008. (AP Photo / Muhammed Muheisen) #

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A seller of traditional Syrian sweets calls out for customers in the Meidan quarter of Damascus September 2, 2008. Sales of the sweets go up during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. (REUTERS/Khaled al-Hariri) #

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Un vendeur de confiseries traditionnelles syrienne appelle pour les clients au cours du trimestre Meidan de Damas Septembre 2, 2008. Les ventes de bonbons monter pendant le mois sacré musulman du ramadan. (REUTERS / Khaled al-Hariri) #

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A Muslim woman reads a copy of the Koran at the Istiqlal mosque during the second day of ramadan in Jakarta, Indonesia, the world’s most populous Muslim-majority country, on September 2, 2008. (ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Une femme musulmane lit un exemplaire du Coran à la mosquée Istiqlal au cours de la deuxième journée du Ramadan à Jakarta, en Indonésie, le musulman le plus peuplé du monde, pays à majorité, le 2 Septembre 2008. (Adek Berry / AFP / Getty Images) #

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In a pre-Ramadan tradition, Bosnian Muslim girls wash their face with water from cave as local tradition claims that the water and prayers inside the cave will bring personal beauty and success for the year, near the Bosnian town of Kladanj, 50 kms north of Sarajevo, Bosnia, on Sunday, Aug. 31, 2008. More than 30.000 people gathered to pray inside and outside the cave this year. (AP Photo/Amel Emric) #

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Dans une tradition d’avant le Ramadan, les filles musulmanes de Bosnie laver leur visage avec de l’eau provenant de la grotte comme le prétend la tradition locale que l’eau et des prières dans la grotte apporteront la beauté personnelle et de réussite pour l’année, près de la ville bosniaque de Kladanj, 50 km au nord de Sarajevo, en Bosnie, on Sunday, Aug 31, 2008. Plus de 30.000 personnes s’étaient rassemblées pour prier à l’intérieur qu’à l’extérieur de la grotte de cette année. (AP Photo / Amel Emric) #

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A Bangladeshi vendor sells traditional sweet meats for breaking the Ramadan fast, at the Chalk bazaar in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Friday, Sept. 12, 2008. (AP Photo/Pavel Rahman) #

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Un vendeur vend des Bangladeshi traditionnels viandes douces pour rompre le jeûne du ramadan, au bazar de Chalk à Dhaka, au Bangladesh, le vendredi 12 septembre 2008. (AP Photo / Pavel Rahman) #

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An Egyptian family looks to buy a « Fanus Ramadan », a traditional lantern popular during Ramadan, at a shop in el-Sayeda Zaynab district of downtown Cairo, late August 28, 2008. (KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Une famille égyptienne cherche à acheter une « Fanus Ramadan », une lanterne traditionnelle populaire pendant le ramadan, dans un magasin à El-Sayeda Zaynab quartier du centre-ville du Caire, fin août 28, 2008. (Khaled Desouki / AFP / Getty Images) #

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A Palestinian Muslim girl prays in the men’s mosque before the evening prayer called « tarawih », during the holy fasting month of Ramadan in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2008. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen) #

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Une fille prie musulmans palestiniens dans la mosquée les hommes avant la prière du soir appelé «tarawih», au cours du mois de jeûne du Ramadan dans la ville de Ramallah en Cisjordanie, le mercredi 17 septembre 2008. (AP Photo / Muhammed Muheisen) #

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A Pakistani man offers Friday prayers atop a mosque roof during the holy Muslim month of Ramadan in Peshawar, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 5, 2008. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad) #

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Un Pakistanais offre la prière du vendredi au sommet d’un toit de mosquée pendant le mois sacré musulman du ramadan à Peshawar, au Pakistan le vendredi 5 septembre 2008. (AP Photo / Mohammad Sajjad) #

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A man has his eyes smeared with traditional Kohl eyeliner before Friday prayers during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad September 5, 2008. (REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder) #

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Un homme a les yeux barbouillés de eyeliner traditionnel Kohl avant les prières du vendredi durant le mois de jeûne musulman du Ramadan dans le sud de la ville indienne d’Hyderabad Septembre 5, 2008. (REUTERS / Krishnendu Halder) #

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The Al-Zaim family of Duxbury, Massachusetts sits, gathered together for their dinner after 7pm on September 14th, 2008, to break their Ramadan Fast. (Justine Hunt/Globe Staff Photo) #

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La famille Al-Zaim de Duxbury, Massachusetts s’assoit, réunis pour leur dîner after 7pm le 14 Septembre 2008, à rompre leur jeûne de Ramadan. (Justine Hunt / Globe Staff Photo) #

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Workers sew prayer caps in a factory in old Dhaka, Bangladesh on September 18, 2008. Prayer caps have huge demand during the holy month of Ramadan. (REUTERS/Andrew Biraj) #

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Travailleurs coudre casquettes prière dans une ancienne usine à Dhaka, Bangladesh le Septembre 18, 2008. Casquettes Prière se sont forte demande durant le mois sacré du Ramadan. (REUTERS / Andrew Biraj) #

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Kashmiri Muslims offer prayers inside the Jamia Masjid, or Grand Mosque, on the first Friday of Ramadan in Srinagar, India, Friday, Sept. 5, 2008. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin) #

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Kashmiri musulmans des prières à l’intérieur du Jamia Masjid, ou Grande Mosquée, le premier vendredi du Ramadan, à Srinagar, en Inde, le vendredi 5 septembre 2008. (AP Photo / Dar Yasin) #

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A child prepares food for Iftar (evening meal) before the breaking of fast on the first day of Ramadan at Memon Mosque in Karachi, Pakistan on September 2, 2008. (REUTERS/Athar Hussain) #

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Un enfant prépare le repas pour Iftar (repas du soir) avant la rupture du jeûne, le premier jour du ramadan à la mosquée Memon à Karachi, au Pakistan le Septembre 2, 2008. (REUTERS / Athar Hussain) #

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Lebanese « Musaharati » Mohammed Fanas wakes up observant Muslims for their overnight « suhur » meal before the day’s fast in Sidon’s Old City in south Lebanon just before dawn on September 3, 2008. (MAHMOUD ZAYAT/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Libanais « Musaharati » Mohammed Fanas réveille musulmans pratiquants pour leur nuit « suhur« repas avant la journée de jeûne dans la vieille ville de Saïda au Sud-Liban juste avant l’aube, Septembre 3, 2008. (MAHMOUD ZAYAT / AFP / Getty Images) #

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Visually impaired Palestinian students read verses of the Koran, Islam’s holiest book, written in Braille, during the holy fasting month of Ramadan at Al-Qabas Islamic school in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Sunday, Sept. 7, 2008. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen) #

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Ayant une déficience visuelle étudiants palestiniens de lire des versets du Coran, livre saint de l’islam, écrit en braille, au cours du mois de jeûne du Ramadan à Al-Qabas école islamique dans la ville de Ramallah en Cisjordanie, Sunday, Sept. 7, 2008. (AP Photo / Muhammed Muheisen) #

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Workers dry vermicelli, a specialty eaten during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad, India on September 5, 2008. (REUTERS/Krishnendu Halder) #

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Travailleurs vermicelles sec, une spécialité consommés durant le mois de jeûne musulman du Ramadan, dans le sud de la ville indienne de Hyderabad, en Inde le 5 Septembre, 2008. (REUTERS / Krishnendu Halder) #

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A Kashmiri man rests after performing prayers inside the shrine of Sufi saint, Mir Syed Ali Hamdani, during Ramadan in Srinagar, in Indian-administered Kashmir on September 11, 2008. (REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli) #

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Un homme cachemiri repose après avoir effectué les prières à l’intérieur du sanctuaire de saint soufi, Mir Syed Ali Hamdani, pendant le Ramadan à Srinagar, au Cachemire sous administration indienne sur le Septembre 11, 2008. (REUTERS / Fayaz Kabli) #

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Thai Muslim children pray at a mosque during Ramadan in Narathiwat province in Thailand on September 9, 2008. (MADAREE TOHLALA/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Thai enfants musulmans prient dans une mosquée pendant le ramadan dans la province de Narathiwat, en Thaïlande, le Septembre 9, 2008. (MADAREE TOHLALA / AFP / Getty Images) #

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Afghan men offer prayers on a hill top overlooking Kabul, Afghanistan on September 8, 2008, during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. (SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Hommes afghans offrir des prières au sommet d’une colline surplombant Kaboul, en Afghanistan, Septembre 8, 2008, durant le mois sacré musulman du ramadan. (Shah Marai / AFP / Getty Images) #

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A worker prepares traditional sweets at a pastry shop in Tehran, Iran on the fifth day of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan September 6, 2008. (REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl) #

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Un travailleur prépare gâteaux traditionnels à une pâtisserie à Téhéran, l’Iran, le cinquième jour du mois de jeûne musulman du ramadan, Septembre 6, 2008. (REUTERS / Morteza Nikoubazl) #

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Muslim women attend prayers on the eve of the first day of the Islamic fasting month of Ramadan at a mosque in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia on August 31, 2008. (REUTERS/Sigit Pamungkas) #

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Les femmes musulmanes assistent à la prière à la veille du premier jour du mois de jeûne musulman du ramadan dans une mosquée de Surabaya, East Java, en Indonésie, le 31 août 2008. (REUTERS / Pamungkas Sigit) #

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In this picture taken on September 13, 2008 a Pakistani labourer stacks bananas being kept in increased quantities for the holy month of Ramadan in the storeroom of a fruit market in Islamabad, Pakistan. (FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Sur cette photo prise le 13 Septembre 2008, un ouvrier pakistanais bananes piles étant conservés en quantités accrues pour le mois sacré du ramadan dans le cellier d’un marché de fruits à Islamabad, au Pakistan. (FAROOQ NAEEM / AFP / Getty Images) #

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A boy sleeps in a mosque while waiting to break his fast on the first day of Ramadan in Makassar, Indonesia on September 1, 2008.

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Un garçon dort dans une mosquée en attendant de pouvoir rompre son jeûne le premier jour du Ramadan à Makassar, Indonésie au Septembre 1, 2008.

 

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